Young Sherlock Holmes: Death Cloud – Andrew Lane

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4 out of 5 stars

Spoilers ahead.

First published in 2010, Young Sherlock Holmes: Death Cloud is the first novel in a (at this point in time) seven book series written by British author Andrew Lane. As the title suggests, it follows the fourteen-year-old Sherlock Holmes in a time before he met John Watson. The first novel is sees Sherlock’s father sent over to seas to India whilst his mother is ill and his sister is left to care for her. As the oldest male in the house, his brother Mycroft sends Sherlock to spend his summer holidays in a small village near Portsmouth with relatives he can hardly remember. At the same time, a young homeless child named Matty witnesses a dark cloud floating away from a building only to learn that whomever had been inside had been found dead from a mysterious illness. When Sherlock discovers another body under similar circumstances, the two boys team up to discover the truth.

I was left with a fair few questions after reading this book – but that doesn’t mean that I didn’t enjoy it.

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Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children – Ransom Riggs

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5 out of 5 stars

Spoilers ahead

Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children is the debut novel of American author, Ransom Riggs, and was first published in 2011. The novel centres around the narrating character, Jacob, and his search for answers after the death of his grandfather. First believing that his grandfather had been mauled by wild animals in the woods beside his home, Jacob is soon travelling to an island off the coast of Wales at the advise of his psychiatrist to find the orphanage is grandfather said he had once stayed in near the beginning of World War Two. Jacob soon learns that the stories his grandfather told him as a child and the photos he had shown him of all the children he had met were in fact true. The children are alive, Miss Peregrine is real, and so are the monsters they have been hiding from.

I went into this novel with mixed opinions. For my part, I was intrigued by the idea of a novel written around vintage photography – especially as those inspiring images were included in special annexes throughout the book. The synopsis drew me in and I wanted to know more. But there were also reviews out there saying this novel was poorly executed and a waste of a good idea.

After getting through the novel in a fairly quick time, I have to say that I disagree. This novel was fantastic.

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Assassin’s Creed: Brotherhood – Oliver Bowden

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3.5 out of 5 stars

Spoilers ahead.

First published in 2010, Brotherhood is the second book in the novelization of the Assassin’s Creed game series. The games were published by Ubisoft and the novels were written by British author, Oliver Bowden. Brotherhood continues the story of Ezio Auditore de Firenze, an Italian Assassin who joined the Order in his teens and is now in his early forties. It continues straight from the end of the first novel making it doubly important to have read Renaissance or to have at least played Assassin’s Creed 2.

It was good but it wasn’t great…

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Assassin’s Creed: Renaissance – Oliver Bowden

4

4/5 stars

Spoilers ahead.

Based on the video game Assassin’s Creed 2, this novel by Oliver Bowden follows Ezio Auditore, a seventeen-year-old Italian nobleman set to continue his father’s banking empire. However, he is unaware of his family’s true legacy – his family is connected to the Order of Assassin’s, a group of elite killers set on keeping the Pieces of Eden from falling into the hands of the Templars. Who conveniently happen to be the family that Ezio cannot stand.

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